First two story building
printed on site in Europe with BOD2

In July 2020, KampC unveiled the first two story house printed on site in Europe. The house is eight meters tall and has a floor area of 90 square meters and it is printed with Europe’s largest 3d concrete printer made by COBOD. You can find Flanders’ first 3D-printed model home on the premises of Kamp C in Westerlo, Belgium.

“What makes this house so unique, is that we printed it with a fixed 3D concrete printer”, says Emiel Ascione, the project manager at Kamp C. “Other houses that were printed around the world only have one floor. In many cases, the components were printed in a factory and were assembled on-site. We, however, printed the entire building envelope in one piece on-site.”

“The material’s compressive strength is three times greater than that of the conventional quick build brick”

Marijke Aerts, project manager at Kamp C

“Other houses that were printed around the world only have one floor. In many cases, the components were printed in a factory and were assembled on-site. We, however, printed the entire building envelope in one piece on-site.”

Emiel Ascione, project manager at Kamp C

“Our aim was to print the floor area, height, and shape of an average contemporary home, in the form of a model home with multipurpose options. This is a principle of circular building. The building can be used as a house, a meeting space, an office, or an exhibition space.”

Piet Wielemans, architect at Kamp C

Besides the fibres in the concrete, the amount of wire-mesh reinforcement used is extremely limited. As a result of the printing technology used, formwork was redundant, saving an estimated sixty percent on material, time, and budget. In the future, an entire house could be printed in just under two days. If you add up all the days, it took just three weeks to print the house at Kamp C.

The house was printed as part of the European C3PO with financing from ERDF (the European Regional Development Fund). With this feat, the project partners hope to raise interest in the building industry about the use of 3D concrete printing as a building technique.